Osman Khalid Butt Hits Back At Angry Trolls With a Poignant Twitter Thread

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Osman Khalid Butt spoke up for the women’s rights march happening in Pakistan. The actor took to Twitter to write a mini-essay to hit back at trolls who were diminishing the ‘Aurat March’ with a ‘Mard March’.

Osman Khalid Butt was awarded an Agent of Social Change Awards at Masala! Awards last year and this thread is proof why he deserved the award!

“#MardMarch, because some men get their panties in a twist over women exercising their right to speak out for one goddamn day. Oh, did I say panties? I mean boxer briefs. Manly boxer briefs. So man, much wow. Did their placards offend you? It’s just locker room talk.”

Osman was heavily trolled after this tweet. He later turned this tweet into a thread about the pervasive misogyny in the comments that he faced.

“After a deep dive into the comments under this, first off, let me assure you: I am not an atheist, not some liberal puppet, nor am I a gender traitor; I am not promoting some insidious agenda, I do not seek the ‘attention’ you’re giving me, nor do I desperately want a sex change,” tweeted the young actor. “Far as the twenty odd placards from the Aurat March circulating online are concerned, some of them don’t mean what you think they do, some are obviously photoshopped, and some are satirical & borderline crude.”

The Baaghi actor continued, “These, and countless others placards from the march, are a reaction to patriarchy, subjugation, widespread misogyny, abuse, harassment, societal barriers; they come from a frustration no man can truly understand. A couple may have missed the mark in an attempt to be clever, but it is astounding that the essence of the March, the protests demanding equality, peace, a voice; protests against child marriages, child labor, acid attacks, domestic & other forms of violence, harassment, rape… were all eclipsed by a handful you found vulgar. Most of the people raging against the Aurat March on Twitter either based their opinions solely on the ‘controversial’ placards, or chose to ignore everything else. These are not made-up issues; they are very real.”

He addressed the “Mard March” hence. “It is one thing to serve some playful snark, which is what I thought would happen when I clicked on the #MardMarch hashtag. Instead, what I got were furious conspiracy theories (even from members of the NA), demanding probes into who funded the march, how it is an attack on our religion, on our state (!), how this is western propaganda; a celebration of beghairati – and these aren’t even the vile, obscene reactions. Women in this country are being denied basic human rights. We continue to diminish their voices in the name of accepted patriarchy. Before we teach a woman how to be honorable, we must first become honorable men ourselves. Our comments, our outrage, our language does not reflect that. Before we jump to conclusions, we must properly investigate as to whether something is, in fact, what we’re being fed it is.”

Osman continued to defend the Aurat March stating that it spoke up about relevant issues. “This was not a ‘fahaash liberal parade’ – it was an important, nationwide event that attempted to start a debate, a conversation about women’s issues we’ve turned a blind eye to for far too long. Let’s please not diminish that. Feminism is not something to be scared of, to react to and dismiss so violently, even if you feel its brand is rough around the edges right now. Neither is liberal thought or demanding civic rights something to curse at. I am certainly not denying you your right to an opinion. By all means, feel uncomfortable. Some of those placards were meant to evoke that exact reaction. But don’t lose sight of what the march stood for. I am attaching some pictures to counter the ones in rotation. Peace.”

Osman is going to be seen onscreen with Amna Ilyas, Mohsin Abbas Haider and Meera in the upcoming Saqib Malik film, Baaji.





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